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Greedy Trial Lawyer

Our Government Is Stealing Our Rights

April 09, 2006

By Greedy Trial Lawyer

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Category: Gaming The System

While our attention is drawn to tort reform efforts in each state legislature, our federal government (a.k.a. George Bush & Business Cronies) is surreptitiously accomplishing an even more sweeping theft of our rights by using federal regulatory procedures.

Is it time for the Impeach George Bush billboards?

The Cleveland Law Library Weblog reports on the serious concerns of state legislators:

More on "Silent Tort Reform"

At the recent meeting of the National Conference of State Legislatures, the state legislators expressed concern over federal regulatory bodies creating lenient standards for manufacturers that prevent the states from imposing stricter standards. "'Federal regulatory preemption is nothing more than a backdoor, underhanded means by which unelected federal bureaucrats impose their will on the states,' New York state Sen. Michael Balboni (R), chair of NCSL's standing committees, said at a news conference". Legislators Sound Warning on Federal Rules by Kavan Peterson, Stateline.org, April 6, 2006. The NCSL has issued a Preemption Monitor, which highlights pending and recently finalized federal preemption proposals. See our prior post Are Federal Regulators Thwarting Personal Injury Claims?

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Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Our Government Is Stealing Our Rights:

» Preemption, Nth Part from TortsProf Blog
The National Conference of State Legislatures has expressed concern about the silent tort reform of federal agencies seeking to preempt state tort law. Among the NCSL's efforts is the Preemption Monitor [PDF], a report including a number of federal act... [Read More]

Tracked on April 9, 2006 09:32 PM

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