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My Greedy Roots

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July 05, 2007

By Greedy Trial Lawyer

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Trial Lawyer Vigilantes Bringing The Bad Guys To Justice

Category: My Greedy Roots

As a child I always felt vigilantes were admirable sorts who dispensed justice and protected the decent folks in some pretty rough places. Maybe that was why I was drawn to personal injury law.

Today, I came across a Wall Street Journal editorial which recognizes the vigilante role of the trial lawyer.

State AGs and Contingency Lawyers: Acceptable Bedfellows?

Posted by Peter Lattman on the Wall Street Journal Law Blog:

The WSJ editorial board takes up the issue of government outsourcing legal work to plaintiffs lawyers [under contingency fee arrangements].

Today's editorial notes that defendant companies are starting to fight back on the issue. In April, a California state court ruled that Santa Clara county could not pay contingency fees to private attorneys -- Thornton & Naumes and Motley Rice -- who were suing lead-paint manufacturers on behalf of the government. In rejecting the arrangement, Judge Jack Komar cited a California Supreme Court case noting that a contingency arrangement "is antithetical to the standard of neutrality that an attorney representing the government must meet."

A prosecutor's job "is not that it shall win a case, but that justice should be done," writes the WSJ, citing the Supreme Court. "Sometimes that means foregoing a suit, or balancing litigation with other public policy goals. Such concepts aren't priorities for trial lawyers, whose main goal is to hit the financial jackpot. The U.S. justice system is frayed enough without making trial lawyers the deputized vigilantes of public prosecutors."

From my point of view, it is because the justice system is frayed that trial lawyers need to be the public's deputized vigilantes. Once we achieve justice for all (not just the corporations) we can hang up our six-shooters and return to ranching.

November 12, 2006

By Greedy Trial Lawyer

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Being Greedy May Be Keeping Me Healthy

Category: My Greedy Roots

Several years back there was a popular song, Don't Worry, Be Happy. It turns out happy people may have fewer health problems to worry about because they are....happy. This is the conclusion of a study just reported.

I need to read the research findings to see what the other positive emotions were that also made people happier. Could greed be one?

Happy People Are Healthier, Carnegie Mellon Psychologist Says

Happiness and other positive emotions play an even more important role in health than previously thought, according to a study published in the journal Psychosomatic Medicine by Carnegie Mellon University Psychology Professor Sheldon Cohen.

The researchers interviewed volunteers over several weeks to assess their moods and emotional styles, and then infected them with either a rhinovirus or an influenza virus. The volunteers were quarantined and examined to see if they came down with a cold.

The people who report positive emotions are less likely to catch colds and also less likely to report symptoms when they do get sick. This held true regardless of their levels of optimism, extroversion, purpose and self-esteem, and of their age, race, gender, education, body mass or prestudy immunity to the virus.

November 05, 2006

By Greedy Trial Lawyer

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Let's Bring Back The Good Old Days On Our School Playgrounds

Category: My Greedy Roots

More and more elementary schools are banning the game of tag from playgrounds. Why? To prevent accidents (read: lawsuits) and to keep kids' self-esteem intact. But if physical harm and psychological harassment can be hidden in a simple game of tag, surely educational experts must be on alert for other forms of abusive playground games.

This is the premise of a fantasy trip by The Christian Science Monitor in a recent article focusing on education (read: lawyer-bashing). The article is a studied (read: childish) analysis of the efforts to make school playgrounds safer and more supportive of each child's emotional growth.

Schools are banning tag. What's next: musical chairs?

The next to go, of course, would have to be duck-duck-goose. Frankly, I'm surprised it is still being played, what with the running around chairs and the touching of people's hair. And what about the hazards of running around a circle of chairs? Children could trip and get seriously injured or, at the very least, get their feelings hurt.

Musical chairs? Outta here. Talk about exclusionary. Scrambling for a seat is not only dangerous, it implies competition which, as we all know, is not what American schools are about.

Hopscotch? Are you kidding? Throwing stones? Forget it. Seesaw? Come on. I still have a bruised tailbone from the third grade. Monkey bars? If I climb, is the school district calling me a monkey? Swings? Ever see how high these kids go?

If we ban tag, we are sending the wrong message: "Kids, we live in fear. We are afraid that your game may cause injuries. We are afraid that some children are being chased more than others, and that this game is a form of bullying. But we are mostly afraid of the price tag of lawsuits."

It's vital to let kids be kids - in an environment free from fear. Letting them chase one another in a game of tag may prevent problems down the road. Children who aren't afraid of a skinned knee or a bruised ego or of being tagged "it" are more likely to chase rainbows as adolescents, and dreams as young adults. They're the ones who won't be afraid of going for "it" in life.

During my childhood we carried pocket knives to school and tossed them at the feet of our playmates to see who could get the closest; we played pickup baseball (read: really hard ball); we played tackle football without pads or helmets; we played dodge ball until only one nimble classmate was left standing. Those were the good old days - they made me the Greedy Trial Lawyer that I am.

May 20, 2006

By Greedy Trial Lawyer

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Insatiably Greedy Trial Lawyers On The Move

Category: My Greedy Roots

From New York there is a report on an advanced group of greedy trial lawyers. I may not qualify for membership because my greediness is satiable. Of course, I could work on that character flaw.

With legal bills gouging the city and propelling insurance rates for doctors, drivers and businesses into the stratosphere, the need for tort reform in New York is obvious. Except to Albany, where the insatiably greedy trial lawyers' lobby wields undue influence. The latest attempt to pick pockets is an unconscionable bill that would create a new way to collect in wrongful-death lawsuits -- and cost the city millions.

The measure passed by the state Senate Judiciary Committee this week would permit payouts for families' "emotional anguish." Which relatives could collect? Unclear. How many tears, how many bills from shrinks, would it take to justify damages? Unclear, too. And very, very subjective. And very, very expensive.

November 03, 2005

By Greedy Trial Lawyer

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Words I Live By

Category: My Greedy Roots

Money Is Everything

Better a Frivolous Lawsuit than No Lawsuit At All

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November 03, 2005

By Greedy Trial Lawyer

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I Object To Ravenous

Category: My Greedy Roots

There may be some ravenous trial lawyers, but I am not one of them. Freedom Works caught my attention with the use of ravenous in its press release slamming trial lawyers for outrageous claims of obesity liability.

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November 02, 2005

By Greedy Trial Lawyer

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Why I Am What I Am And Do What I Do

Category: My Greedy Roots

We need to get one thing straight at the start. I am a Greedy Trial Lawyer, always have been and always will be. I sue the bastards, file frivolous lawsuits, clog the court system, drive doctors out of town, put corporations into bankruptcy, weaken the economy and increase the cost of health insurance. And, that is only a partial list.

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